Mummy Monday: Nesshou

This week let me introduce you to Nesshou, a priest from the Ptolemaic Period. He is currently located at the Musee d’Yverdon les Bains in Switzerland and has the most complete funerary collection in all of Switzerland.

Life

Nesshou was born sometime during the Ptolemaic Period, presumably in the city of Akhmin. His father’s name was Nes-Min and was a Sema-priest to the god Min. His mother was named Isis-weret who was a Mistress of the House and Musician of the God Min.

Nesshou’s name (which can also be written as Nes-Shou or Nes-Shu) means “Belonging of Shu.” Shu is the god of the Air and father of Nut, Goddess of the Sky, and Geb, God of the Earth.

Nesshou took the same job as his father which was a Sema-priest of the God Min. A Sema priest is someone who takes care of the clothing of the god. In most temples, there was a large statue of the god that would have been clothed every morning.

Provenance

The mummy was donated by Edwin Simond-Bey. He was an Australian who moved to Alexandria, Egypt when he was a child. His family was originally from Yverdon, Switzerland and that is where Edwin completed school. When he returned to Egypt, he was working for the Land Mortgage Company of Egypt. Edwin also took part in many excavations and left many of his finds to a museum in Alexandria.

Because of his contributions, in 1869 the khedive Taufiq awarded him the title of Bey and gifted him the mummy and its sarcophagus. Now typically these mummies that were gifted to royals, nobles, and collectors have little to no provenance. This mummy however was excavated in Akhmin by Gaston Maspero and his team in 1885.

Within the same year, Edwin donated the mummy to his hometown of Yverdon (MY/3775). It was opened in Town Hall on July 11th, 1869. About 80 people attended including many ladies wearing hats.

The collection at the museum was expanded in 1983 and 1993. It now contains about 204 pieces. The exhibit mainly focuses on the mummy. Unfortunately, just a few days before this post, the mummy was taken off of the display. It was taken down mostly for ethical reasons, as the mummy is mostly unwrapped. But it also needs to be heavily conserved.

Coffin

The mummy was found in an anthropoid coffin made of wood. It was then stuccoed and painted in bright colors. The lower part of the lid has a spell of Nut. This is where the goddess symbolically becomes the divine mother of the deceased and is asked to lay down upon him keeping away all evil spirits.

You can read more about the decorations on the coffin in this article below.

The mummy was wrapped in what could have been 11 yards of papyrus with the Book of the Dead written on it. It originally consisted of 13 layers of papyrus. Much of this papyrus was damaged after it was unwrapped. Some pieces were reassembled and put under glass plates.

Within these wrappings were 14 amulets. 4 of these were removed during the unwrapping. They are made out of faience and gilded wood.

The mummy also had a cartonnage mummy mask and other cartonnage elements.

Mummy

Nesshou was about 50 years old when he died. He had a couple of medical problems, but nothing that could tell us how he died. He has osteoarthritis in his right shoulder and arteriosclerosis in both knees. The condition in his knees would be very painful like gout, so Nesshou would probably be in a lot of pain in his last few years.

He, like many ancient Egyptian mummies, had pretty bad abrasions on his teeth. There were deep carious lesions that could have caused a severe infection around the roots of an upper molar.

Sources

https://mummipedia.fandom.com/wiki/Nesshou

https://www.swissmummyproject.uzh.ch/en/research-1/swissmummies/neshou.html

https://news.in-24.com/news/21602.html

https://news.in-24.com/lifestyle/art/81913.html

http://rheumatologe.blogspot.com/2012/02/chondrocalcinosis.html

http://www.musee-yverdon-region.ch/musee.php?include=collections&lng=en#egypte

https://www.swissmummyproject.uzh.ch/en/research-1/dentalproject.html

http://www.egyptologyforum.org/THOE/Heritage_of_Egypt_3.pdf

Image Sources

Mummy in case – Mummipedia

Mummy in CT – University of Zurich

Mummy and sarcophagus – https://news.in-24.com/news/21602.html

Mummy, x-rays, and museum – https://switzerlandroadways.blogspot.com/2010/06/yverdon-les-bains-castle-baths-mummies.html

Museum – https://news.in-24.com/lifestyle/art/81913.html

X-ray of knees – http://rheumatologe.blogspot.com/2012/02/chondrocalcinosis.html

Mummy – Flickr (strobel zsuzsi)

Nesshou’s teeth – https://www.swissmummyproject.uzh.ch/en/research-1/dentalproject.html

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